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4 tricks to treat and prevent kids’ toothaches

What’s behind your child’s toothache? It could be the workings of a well-known villain: Tooth Decay. If the pain doesn’t disappear in a few days, squeeze in a dentist appointment. While you’re waiting:

Try holding a cold pack against their jaw. You can also use ice wrapped in a wet washcloth; they can help give kids toothache relief.

Don’t give them anything too hot or cold to eat or drink. Hold off on ice cream until they’re better – it could make the pain worse.

To help kids steer clear of toothaches – and minimize extra dentist visits – it’s best to start good habits early.

Teach them to brush twice a day. And remember those back teeth! They’re where cavities most often pop up. Remind kids that flossing is important as well, and help them get into the habit once a day (usually before bedtime).

Play up healthy snacks. Sugary, sticky foods stick around and are more likely to cause decay. Snacks like apples or bananas are better for your kids, and their teeth.

In some cases, kids may experience toothaches after a visit to the dentist, especially in relation to braces. While having braces applied is not painful, the days after this appointment are often more difficult. After the initial application, most wearers will return to the dentist’s office regularly to have their braces tightened or adjusted. To help cope with discomfort and pain:

Remind your child that the pain is temporary. Braces require a short adjustment period. What starts off as feeling strange will feel normal before long

Start off with soft foods. To ease the adjustment, kids with new braces should start out by sticking to foods that are easy to eat like pudding, yogurt, or thin soups.

Try Children’s MOTRIN®, which contains ibuprofen to reduce symptoms of pain and provide relief.

Apply an ice pack. Once you get home from the visit, use an ice pack on the outside of the mouth to decrease inflammation and minimize discomfort.

To be sure this product is right for your child, always read and follow the label.

This information does not constitute a diagnosis of any medical condition or medical advice. Do not substitute the information within this article for medical advice. Always consult your physician or health care provider if you have medical or health questions or concerns.